Friday, February 7, 2020

The Liberal Party of Canada Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

The Liberal Party of Canada - Essay Example On the one hand was the governing coalition of Liberal – Conservatives under the leadership of Sir John A. McDonald in Canada West and his French – Canadian counterpart, George – Etienne Cartier in Canada East. This disparate organization encompassed a number of distinct groups, many of which had potentially conflicting interests – Catholic and Protestants, English and French, Urban and Rural (Stephen Brooks, page 282) â€Å"The Liberal Party of Canada is always located somewhere in the middle of the political spectrum and often finds itself divided between a progressive wing and a conservative wing† (Patrick Malcolmson, Richard Myers, page 178) Base of Support The main support group for the classical liberals consisted of Industrialists, merchants and property owning- individuals while the chief supporters for the contemporary Liberal party includes several middle of the road advocacy groups within the feminist, environmental and multicultural movements, public – sector workers, middle – class intellectuals in the universities and the media, the national Liberal Party and the Bloc Quebecois; think – tanks including Canadian Policy Research Networks, the institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canada West Foundation. ( Stephen Brooks, page 40 - 41) According to the views propagated by R. B. McCullum, the Liberal Party was the â€Å"party of the middle class, with the support of the industrial workers† (Robert Kelly, page 43) Political Ideology One way of categorizing political ideas – perhaps the most popular way – is to describe them as being left wing/ right wing or centrist/ moderate.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Organic Foods in India Essay Example for Free

Organic Foods in India Essay Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consumers’ decision-making process for purchase of organically produced foods in India Design/methodology/approach – Using already existing research model and scale, forming hypothesis, and testing its validity in Indian context. Using convenient sampling (Tier 1, 2 B school Graduates) to gather data for factor loading. Type of Research – Descriptive Research Introduction Organic production system is a system that produces organic foods in harmony with nature and the environment. In other words, this is a unique system which ensures that the â€Å"best practices† in the area of production are utilized to ensure that the output is a healthy and safe apart from having a positive symbiotic effect with the environment. Thus, one can say in lay man’s terms that an organic food product is one that has been produced using only natural agents in the production process. For the vast majority of human history, food has been produced organically. It was only during the 20th century that new synthetic chemicals were introduced to the food supply. Under organic production process, the use of conventional non-organic pesticides, insecticides and herbicides is heavily regulated. In the case of livestock, they are reared without the routine use of antibiotics and growth hormones. Scenario in India Organic foods are fast changing from a fad to a serious proposition in India. Today, the reach of organic foods is expanding to gradually find its way into the average Indian household. An indicative reason for the same is the rising health consciousness among Indian consumers. Pegged at Rupees 6. 5 billion in 2010, the organic food market is witnessing the shift from being an elitist to a healthy product. Although production and consumption figures for organic food in India are way behind the world average, the market is now showing signs of a strong growth trend. Slowly the deterrent of high price is being out-weighed by nutrition, quality and a chance to shape a safe environment. The organic food products market has been continuously facing the issue of absence of recognizable brands, small range of products, high prices and faulty government policies and a general lack of retail presence which has translated to low demand in the domestic market. In spite of this industry players are optimistic about the future prospects, as they are of the opinion that this industry holds a lot of promise. The export industry remains undeveloped with most producers being either small or marginal farmers, small cooperatives or trade fair companies. The small farmers, scattered across the country, offer an incomplete product range that are mostly available as a local brand. This is especially an issue in developed countries where the shelves of an average supermarket is stocked with a large range of certified organic foods. Problem Statement The question on everyone’s mind is where exactly is the organic food industry falling short? What are the main factors that influence a consumer’s decision to purchase organic foods? The fact of the matter is that this area has suffered from lack of interest/attention and a very low level of research. Thus, our Problem Statement is as follows â€Å"What influences the decision to buy organic food products in India? † Research objective The purpose of this assignment is to understand the primary influencers that motivate our target study group of individuals belonging to the upper middle-class category in their decision to buy organic foods products in India. Since the students of the top B-Schools either belong to or will be a part of the aforementioned category and will be starting new families, they are part of core prospective customer segment for this market. Hence, we have decided to focus our research on them. Literature Review Scope This research study focuses on understanding the primary influencers motivate our subjects (individuals from the upper middle class category) to buy organic foods. Students of B-Schools are from diverse backgrounds and origins. Most belong to the upper middle class category and we can safely assume that those that aren’t will be a part after they graduate. Moreover, they are also in that stage of life where they start a family of their own and assume additional personal responsibilities. This makes them appropriate subjects for this study. This study will analyse their responses with respect to knowledge about and attitude towards organic food, and their sensitivity to the health and environmental benefits associated with it. Sources and their Details: Honkanen, P. (2006), â€Å"Ethical values and motives driving organic food choice†, Journal of Consumer Behaviour , 5, pp. 420-430 The paper tries to investigate the role of ethical motives in consumers choice of organic food. The relation between ethical food choice motives, attitudes and intention to consume organic food was studied by estimating a structural equation model. We were able to comprehend ethical motives better and were thus able to incorporate it under environmental Consciousness. Donovan, P. , McCarthy R. (2002), â€Å"Irish Consumer preference for organic meat†, British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 3/4/5, pp. 353-370 The paper tries to examine Irish perception of organic meat. It identified three consumer groups. Beliefs and purchase intentions of consumers and non-consumers were differentiated. Proposed factors leading to purchase intention were Health Consciousness, Perceived value, Income and environmental concern. After validation checks they had had to make the constructs less abstracts due to low values. Aertsens, J. , Verbeke, W. , Mondelaers, K. , and Huylenbroeck, G. V. (2009), â€Å"Personal determinants of organic food consumption: a review†, British Food Journal, Vol. 111 No. 10, pp. 1140-1167 It uses theliterature concerning personal determinants of organic food consumption. This is the ? rst paper providing a comprehensive overview and linking the literature on organic food consumption to the values theory and the theory of planned behaviour, including the role of personal norm and focusing on emotions. The proposed integration of mental processing in an organic food consumption model leads to interesting hypotheses and recommendations for policy makers, researchers and stakeholders involved in the organic food market. Padel, S. , Foster, C. (2005), â€Å"Exploring the gap betweenattitudes and behaviour, Understanding why consumers buy or do notbuyorganic food†, British Food Journal, Vol. 107 No. 8, pp. 606-625 Its results show that most consumers associate organic at ? rst with vegetables and fruit and a healthy diet with organic products. Fruit and vegetables are also the ? rst and in many cases only experience with buying organic product. The decision-making process is complex and the importance of motives and barriers may vary between product categories. The motives and barriers provided herein helped us in adapting the survey questionnaire. Baker, S. (2004), â€Å"Mapping the values driving organic food choice, Germany vs the UK†, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 38 No.8, pp. 995-1012. This study explores the reasons why the behaviour of consumers in the UK and Germany has been so divergent despite both groups of consumers holding similar attitudes about organic foods. This was done by investigating the underlying values driving food choice behaviour using means-end theory and Laddermap 5. 4 software. The dominant means-end hierarchies were uncovered and the cognitive process mapped. {draw:frame} Makatouni, A. (2002), â€Å"What motivates consumers to buy organic food in the UK? , Results from a quantitative study† , British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 3/4/5, pp. 345-352 Its main objectives are to identify beliefs, with respect to organic food, of parents who buy and do not buy organic food; the positive as well as negative attitudes towards organic food of those who buy and do not buy organic food; the impact of those attitudes on food choice for parents who buy and do not buy organic food; and to model the food choice behaviour of parents with respect to organic food. It employs both qualitative and quantitative methods. This paper also uses the means-end chain approach. The key idea is that product attributes are a means for consumers to obtain desired ends. It provides a very detailed means end chain which helped us finalize some aspects of our questionnaire. Magistris, T. , Gracia, A. (2008), â€Å"The decision to buy organic food products in Southern Italy†, British Food Journal , Vol. 110 No. 9, pp. 929-947 Its findings provide more evidence on consumers’ underlying motivations to buy organic food to the already existing evidence in Europe to evaluate the future implementation of the Regulation (EC) no. 834/2007 of 28 June 2007 on organic production and labelling of organic products. In addition to this the empirical results would help local policy makers to establish appropriate market strategies to develop the future demand for these products. It indicates that consumer’ attitudes towards organic food, in particular towards the health attribute and towards the environment are the most important factors that explain consumers’ decision-making process for organic food products. It has been found that larger information on the organic food market, which drives to a higher consumers’ organic food knowledge, is important because it positively in?uences consumers’ attitudes towards organic food products. It also that consumer who try to follow a healthy diet and balanced life are likely to have more positive attitudes towards organic food products and towards the environment, inducing a more likely intention to purchase organic foods. This paper provided with the adequate Structural equation model. It also possessed the relevant constructs and variables which could be easily adapted to Indian requirements. Since for the target segment of our paper income is not an issue, it proved easy to adapt to the theoretical model according to our needs. The questionnaire has been validated, which has been duly adapted by us. Outcome Through this study we hope to drawing links between knowledge about and attitude towards organic food, and their sensitivity to its health and environmental benefits and the decision to buy it. Also, we can gauge as to which are the primary contributors to the purchase decision. This can go a long way in helping a player in the organic food industry understand the market and position himself appropriately to achieve success. Research framework and hypothesis specification A study on the food choice is a complex phenomenon that represents one of the most important parts of human behavior, where several cognitive and behavioral factors can vary sharply between individuals. In other words, whether the consumers intent or decide to purchase organic foods is a difficult task because it depends on many factors that cannot be directly observed. Thus based on the above mentioned paper by Magistris, T. , Gracia, A.(2008), it can be conclude that the more favorable health and environmental attitudes consumers have, the more likely they will buy organic food product. In accordance with this, the first hypothesis of the proposed model is defined as follows: Hypothesis1: When consumer’s attitudes towards organic food (H1-a) and towards the environment (H1-b) are positive, consumers’ intention to buy organic food products will also be more likely to be positive. Hypothesis 2: When a consumer has higher organic food knowledge, he/she will be more likely to have positive attitudes towards organic food products. Hypothesis 3: Consumers’ lifestyles related to healthy diet and balanced life influence internal factors of consumers, such as, attitudes towards organic foods (H3a) and attitudes towards the environment (H3b) during the decision process to buy organic food products. Proposed Research Model {draw:rect} {draw:rect} {draw:rect} Explanation of factors and observed variables Intention to purchase organic foods Intention is the cognitive representation of a person’s readiness to perform a given behaviour, and it is considered the immediate antecedent of behaviour. Findings from many studies reveal that consumers’ attitudes towards different organic food attributes (human health, safety, etc. ) and towards the environment are the most important factors that explain consumers’ decision-making process for organic food products. Organic knowledge Knowledge It indicated the knowledge the consumer possesses about organic food Definition Does the consumer know that, â€Å"_Organic foods are produced without the use of conventional pesticides, arti? cial fertilizers, human waste, or sewage sludge_†? Healthy diet and balanced life Exercise Processed food. Fruits and vegetables Red meat Additive free Health check ups Balanced life The observed variables are self-explanatory Environmental attitudes Pollution Belief that the current developmental path and consumeristic culture will end up destroying the environment Damage It quantifies the feeling that unless we do something the damage to the environment will be irreversible. Conservation Describes whether one performs conservatory tasks. Recycled Preference for consuming recycled products Recycling Whether one partakes in recycling of products Attitudes towards organic food products. Health Does on believe that organic products are healthier? Quality Do organic products have superior quality? Taste Are organic products are more tasty? Research Methodology Data will be collected from a survey conducted across the top B-Schools of the country. It is our opinion that the budding managers from these institutions are (or will be) part of our target group of affluent customers for organic food products. The ? nal sample will include 200 students selected through convenience sampling. This method has a reputation of being less reliable but it is the best suited due to its convenience and low cost. Moreover, it is known to work with a sample that contains students. A questionnaire will be designed to analyze the knowledge of organic food, attitudes towards organic foods and purchase behavior of the selected students. The ? rst question was related to their knowledge on organic food products. The second set of questions comprised of those related to organic food consumption (consumption level, intention) purchase, frequency of purchase, perceived quality, place of purchase, etc.). The third and final question includes several questions on consumers’ attitudes towards organic food products and environmental aspects. The questionnaire also contains questions on socio-demographic characteristics (i. e. sex, family size and composition, age, education, income and lifestyles). The questionnaire format will be validated using a small pilot survey before being administered to the students. Questionnaire Would I buy organic food products? How will you rate your knowledge on organic food products? What is your opinion on â€Å"Organic foods are produced without the use of conventional pesticides, arti?cial fertilizers, humanwaste, or sewage sludge â€Å"? I do exercise regularly I avoid eating processed food I often eat fruit and vegetables I avoid eating food products with additives I take regular health check-ups I try to have an organized and methodical lifestyle Is the current development path is destroying the environment? Unless we do something, environmental damage will be irreversible I practice environmental conservation tasks I prefer consuming recycled products I partake in product recycling Organic products are healthier Organic products have superior quality Organic products are more tasty Activity and time based plan Data Analysis/ The Data analysis will be carried out on the valid survey responses obtained from the respondent pool to which the survey is administered to. We will be using SPPS 17. 0 to carry out various correlation tests to figure out what factors affect the ‘intention to buy organic foods’ and also what sub-factors affect them. This will also allow us to point out which all factors show strong correlations and which all show less correlations. Bibliography Honkanen, P.(2006), â€Å"Ethical values and motives driving organic food choice†, Journal of Consumer Behaviour , 5, pp. 420-430 Donovan, P. , McCarthy R. (2002), â€Å"Irish Consumer preference for organic meat†, British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 3/4/5, pp. 353-370 Aertsens, J. , Verbeke, W. , Mondelaers, K. , and Huylenbroeck, G. V. (2009), â€Å"Personal determinants of organic food consumption: a review†, British Food Journal, Vol. 111 No. 10, pp. 1140-1167 Magistris, T. , Gracia, A. (2008), â€Å"The decision to buy organic food products in Southern Italy†, British Food Journal , Vol. 110 No. 9, pp. 929-947 Padel, S. , Foster, C. (2005), â€Å"Exploring the gap between attitudes and behaviour, Understanding why consumers buy or do not buy organic food†, British Food Journal, Vol. 107 No. 8, pp. 606-625 Baker, S. (2004), â€Å"Mapping the values driving organic food choice, Germany vs the UK†, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 38 No. 8, pp. 995-1012 Makatouni, A. (2002), â€Å"What motivates consumers to buy organic food in the UK? , Results from a quantitative study† , British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 3/4/5, pp. 345-352 Zanoli, R. and Naspetti, S.(2002), â€Å"Consumer motivations in the purchase of organic food: a means-end approach†, British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 8, pp. 643-53. Yiridoe, E. K. , Bonti-Ankomah, S. and Martin, R. C. (2005), â€Å"Comparison of consumer’s perception towards organic versus conventionally produced foods: a review and update of the literature†, Renewable Agriculture and Food System, Vol. 20 No. 4, pp. 193-205. 10. Soler, F. , Gil, J. M. and Sanchez, M. (2002), â€Å"Consumer’s acceptability of organic food in Spain: results from an experimental action market†, British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 8,pp. 670-87. 11. Connor, R., Douglas, L. (2001), â€Å"Consumer attitudes to organic foods†, Nutrition Food Science, Vol. 31, Issue: 5 12. Grunert, S. C. and Juhl, H. J. (1995), â€Å"Values, environmental attitudes, and buying of organic foods†, Journal of Economic Psychology, Vol. 16, pp. 39-62. 13. Chinnici, G. , D’Amico, M. and Pecorino, B. (2002), â€Å"A multivariate statistical analysis of the consumers of organic products†, British Food Journal, Vol. 104 Nos 3/4/5, pp. 187-99. 14. Shepherd, R. , Magnusson, M. and Sjoden, P. O. (2005), â€Å"Determinants of consumer behaviour related to organic foods†, Ambio, Vol. 34 Nos 4-5, pp. 352-9.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

William Few :: essays research papers

William Few He was born in Baltimore in 1748, but his story begins long before his birth. It started when his father’s family immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1680’s. His father just so happened to move to Maryland, where he met his wife, married her, and settled in Baltimore where William was to be born. William had many hard times and little schooling until he was ten, when his family moved to North Carolina. In 1771 William, his father, and his brother joined the regulators, frontiers men who fought against the British royal governor. Because of that his brother was hung and his father’s farm destroyed. The Few’s were forced to move again, now to Georgia. William stayed in North Carolina living by himself until 1776. When he got to Georgia he was accepted to the Bar and began to practice the law in Augusta.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  When the revolutionary war began Few sided with the Whig cause, which was the side of the war fighting for America’s freedom from British rule. Even though Few had little schooling as a child he proved leadership and won a lieutenant-colonelcy, a very high rank in the minutemen army. Few also began to take interest in politics and were elected Georgia provincial congress of 1776. He also was and the state executive, surveyor general, Indian commissioner, as well as served in the Continental Congress general. Few was also reelected to the Georgia assembly.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Four years later Few was picked to be one of the six state delegates to the constitutional convention. Two of the state delegates did not attend the convention. Two did not stay for the duration. Few did not attend much of the convention, and never made a speech. But he helped nationalists vote, and helped have congress approve the constitution. He also approved the state ratifying convention. William Few :: essays research papers William Few He was born in Baltimore in 1748, but his story begins long before his birth. It started when his father’s family immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1680’s. His father just so happened to move to Maryland, where he met his wife, married her, and settled in Baltimore where William was to be born. William had many hard times and little schooling until he was ten, when his family moved to North Carolina. In 1771 William, his father, and his brother joined the regulators, frontiers men who fought against the British royal governor. Because of that his brother was hung and his father’s farm destroyed. The Few’s were forced to move again, now to Georgia. William stayed in North Carolina living by himself until 1776. When he got to Georgia he was accepted to the Bar and began to practice the law in Augusta.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  When the revolutionary war began Few sided with the Whig cause, which was the side of the war fighting for America’s freedom from British rule. Even though Few had little schooling as a child he proved leadership and won a lieutenant-colonelcy, a very high rank in the minutemen army. Few also began to take interest in politics and were elected Georgia provincial congress of 1776. He also was and the state executive, surveyor general, Indian commissioner, as well as served in the Continental Congress general. Few was also reelected to the Georgia assembly.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Four years later Few was picked to be one of the six state delegates to the constitutional convention. Two of the state delegates did not attend the convention. Two did not stay for the duration. Few did not attend much of the convention, and never made a speech. But he helped nationalists vote, and helped have congress approve the constitution. He also approved the state ratifying convention.

Monday, January 13, 2020

One of the Main Messages in “a Christmas Carol” Is That Love Elevates and Money Corrupts. Discuss. Essay

ONE OF THE MAIN MESSAGES IN â€Å"A CHRISTMAS CAROL† IS THAT LOVE ELEVATES AND MONEY CORRUPTS. DISCUSS. The allegory of Charles Dickens’ â€Å"A Christmas Carol† can be shaped by a variety of different outlooks. Dickens incites the reader by including a riddle of messages, some messages may be more imperative than others. One of the most outstanding messages within the novella is centred on money and love. The crux of Scrooge’s life is based on money, greed and gain twisted his ideals so to make him a wicked and corrupt man. Alternatively, love was also heavily included within the novella. Dickens illustrated how the love of a family and one another elevated all, and ultimately elevated Scrooge. Scrooge was a depraved man â€Å"squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner!† majority of the townsfolk would cower at this presence. He based his morality and life purely on money; greed and gain were his most prominent qualities. Love was a mere inkling of what was in Scrooge. His nephew Fred can be described as an outstanding foil to Scrooge, Fred was poor but lived a comfortable life; whereas Scrooge was rich and corrupt. â€Å"Though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe it has done me good†, Fred commended Christmas even if there was no profit in it, whilst Scrooge condemned its every quality â€Å"bah humbug†, alongside the fact that it made people happy. In Stave 1 when Scrooge is approached by Marley’s ghost he was exposed to his former business partner’s consequence. His spirit wore the â€Å"chain (he) forged in life†, a chain linked by the â€Å"dealings of (his) trade†¦ a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of (his) business†. Marley and Scrooge’s ideals were parallel; they were hand in hand business partners.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Democracy As A Best Solution, And Underlying Capitalist...

Democracy has morphed in the face of time due to exterior forces which in turn have impacted the understanding of what democracy in action should look like. Technology, education, religious decay and rise, and many other facets of modern life have overwhelmed the understanding of what democracy is. Simply engaging with the concept of democracy is in itself an acceptance of values and assumptions about what governments, and many times economies, should look like. But this paper hardly allows for alternative approach, so the mindset and concepts proposed are a result of the acceptance of western understandings of governance, the natural arrival of democracy as a best solution, and underlying capitalist forces which populates democracy at its core, from Locke to the American founding fathers. So the question becomes what democracy actually looks like in the real world. For as lofty or revolutionary as the founders might have been in their goals, American democracy, now and then, has never been as good as what it looks on paper. The evolutional lens of democracy is then one of both how one arrives at governance and what does democracy stand for. Is it having elections, which might or might not be free in nature? Is it torturing and discriminating against its own citizens? Bending to the popular will of the majority? Protecting minorities? Seeing all as equal in the eyes of the law? Is it none of the above? This really becomes then a question of the cause and consequences ofShow MoreRelatedHitler s Influence On The World War II1574 Words   |  7 PagesWar. For the German dictator, the supposed superiority of one race over another is an underlying force in the society in the entire time of history. 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Friday, December 27, 2019

Essay on Global Trends - 1308 Words

1. Conducting Business during the 21st century has many dimensions. To what extent are national forces being superseded by global trends, especially in terms of multilateral institutions such as the European Union and various economic agreements in the Western Hemisphere and Asia? When a company considers investing internationally, what circumstances should influence how much priority is given to global concepts and/or national differences when evaluating the four alternatives for strategic choice? Globalization has triumphed since the last century after the end of the cold war in the late 1980s. It has made extensive efforts to unify the world’s economic order, created tremendous benefits for the countries that participate and is the†¦show more content†¦The trade agreements in the western hemisphere such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) which exists between the United States, Canada and Mexico has led to the removal of trade barriers and restrictions on FDI. As a result, the Canadian and the Mexican economies became stronger. A similar trade agreement exists between the â€Å"Asian Tigers† i.e. Japan and China and the United states known as the Asia- Pacific Economic corporation (ASEAN) and it aimed at eradicating the trade barriers that exist between these countries. The main function of the World trade organization was to facilitate trade amongst countries and currently it has 120 countries under it’s umbrella. These agreements and organizations are facilitating economic integration on a regional and worldwide basis. Major companies that participate in investing internationally are affected by these economic integrations. Market entry strategies such as FDI, Joint ventures, Mergers and Acquisitions, franchising etc. are highly dependent on these integrations and enhance cross-border collaboration among businesses. 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The climate change occurring now, whichRead MoreEssay Global Warming: A Fashion Trend?1320 Words   |  6 Pagesdepicts two models relaxing on top of a skyscraper surrounded by a flooded New York City. Diesel’s ad is effective in promoting their name through shocking photography which creates a strong emotional response and lasting impression. Diesel targets global warming, a hot topic social issue, as a way to promote their brand but does not actually support it. Diesel’s advertisement effectively captures the attention of the audience by the suggestive pose of the models. The models are placed in theRead MoreGlobal Warming Is The Trend Of Continuing Increases1618 Words   |  7 PagesJames Logan High School Global Warming Marcus Bourlard US Government Mrs. Sidhu 12/9/15 Global warming is the trend of continuing increases in the average temperature of the earth’s atmosphere. It has a parallel effect of climate change in our planet earth which will be disastrous to the health of the people and ecosystem if not reduced to a minimum level. One of the primary causes of global warming is the burning of coal which is the most carbon rich of all fossil fuels used toRead MoreGlobal Trends1020 Words   |  5 PagesEntering the Global Market In order for organizations to infiltrate the global market, leaders must create and implement a sound business model and develop global strategies that will allow the organization to compete across national boundaries. The creation of a sound business model provides the value required for organizations to flourish in domestic and global markets. So, before tapping into the global market, organizational leaders should perform an external audit to forecast future trends and marketRead MoreImpact Of Globalization On The Global Business Environment And The Expected Future Trends1493 Words   |  6 Pagesachieve success in the global economy while supporting increasing wages and high living standards for the average citizen (HBS U.S Competitiveness Project, 2015). In short, competitiveness is a shared prosperity that firms win and citizens thrive. US competitiveness ranking experienced a fluctuation during the period of 2008 to 2015. The United States ranked the 1st in 2008 and then steadily decreased to the 7th in 2012, but it gradually increased to the 3rd in 2015 (Global Competitiveness ReportRead MoreEssay On Global Trends995 Words   |  4 PagesThe workforce in today’s business environment has gone through much change and newer trends continue to influence and shape the way in which people work in every position. It has become more digital, more global, diverse, automation-savvy, and social media- proficient. The 2017 global trends report by Deloitte reveals how there is a pivoting to new organizational models; innovation-based HR platforms; employee experience strategies learning and career programs (driven by social and cognitiveRead MoreGlobal Trends in Hospitality7741 Words   |  31 PagesHospitality Management 18 (1999) 427}442 Operational issues and trends in the hospitality industry Peter Jones School of Management Studies for the Service Sector, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK Abstract This article makes some predictions about the future by considering operational issues in the rst part of the next century. Hospitality operations management is considered at two levels * the rm level at which strategic operations management takes place; and the unit levelRead MoreTravel Trends Of Global Tourism1088 Words   |  5 Pages2.3 The travel trends of global tourism The world is getting even more connected year by year. Cheap flights provided by low-cost carriers make weekend breaks in foreign destinations easier than ever, and smart translation apps, map apps, and international hotel booking web pages are eliminating language barriers. We could also see an increase in international business travel due to globalization and an increase in multinational organizations. Some people are easy to be tired of the city which theyRead MoreThe Global Trend Of The European Union1260 Words   |  6 Pagesenergy efficiency and renewable energy become increasingly important. It is also well-known that the climate-change as a result of high CO2-emissions, among others, can only be stopped or at least slowed down by reducing these emissions. The general global trend therefore should move towards an increasing use of renewable energies while gradually stopping dependence on non-renewable energies, such as coal or oil. Despite trade-offs in terms of a possible rise in energy prices and impacts on security ofRead MoreGlobal Economic Trends Ireland3169 Words   |  13 PagesTallinn University of Technology Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration Global Economic Trends Individual Work: â€Å"Ireland† Professor: Ricardo Vicente Student: Roksolana Sliusar Tallinn 2014 Content Introduction 1. General information about Ireland 2. Globalization in Ireland 2.1 General globalization information 2.2 Ireland Political Globalization 2.3 Ireland Social globalization 2.4 Ireland Economic Globalization Conclusion 2 Introduction When I was thinking about that I

Thursday, December 19, 2019

The Role of International Law Concerning Deforestation...

The Role of International Law Concerning Deforestation and Desertification The surface of the earth is, in a sense, its skin-a thin but crucial layer protecting the rest of the planet contained within it. Far more than a simple boundary, it interacts in complex ways with the volatile atmosphere above and the raw earth below. It may seem hard to imagine it as a critical component of the ecological balance, but in fact, the health of the earth’s surface is vital to the health of the global environment as a whole. ~Al Gore Deforestation and Desertification. These lucrative concepts echo throughout the environmental movement both past and present. The realization and analyzation of the human species’ manipulation of the†¦show more content†¦In order to address the role of international law concerning deforestation and desertification it is first important to explore what these concepts entail. Deforestation can be defined as the clearing and destruction of the vital rain forests and forests worldwide. The causes of deforestation lie in the immense population growth and poverty that exists internationally (Office of Technology Assessment 305). Deforestation exists due to the pursuit of fuel sources, clearance for agricultural purposes, timber, paper products, and development. The numerous effects that deforestation creates entails soil erosion, desertification, loss of biodiversity, loss of medicinal value, increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, an oxygen production decline, and of utmost importance the effects which remain unknown. Most importantly of the latter is the future loss of the human species. Deforestation and its effects occur on a global level. It is rapidly occurring in all nations and in the past has been concentrated in Central and South America, Africa, and Asia. Desertification can be defined as earth, land, or soil that has been transformed to an unstable and unproductive area that cannot sustain life. Desertification can be attributed to overpopulation, deforestation, improper irrigationShow MoreRelatedEssay Desertification And Deforestation5662 Words   |  23 PagesDesertification And Deforestation The Amazon Rainforest is probably the most important region that is threatened by deforestation. With over four million squared kilometers it is roughly the size of the United States. The Amazon spreads across nine South American Countries and contains one-fifth of the Worlds fresh water and one-third of the known living species. The land is home to hundreds of indigenous groups and is considered by many to be â€Å"the lungs of the planet†. MostRead MoreDeforestation And Its Effects On The Environment1616 Words   |  7 PagesBackground Webster dictionary defines deforestation as the action or process of clearing of forests. It occurs when humans desire to make use of land covered by forest for other purposes. This clearing of tree is concerning due to the fact that trees are being cut down at a rate much greater then they can grow back. This is called overshot, and can have a devastating impact on the environment. There is an estimated loss of 18 million acres of forest each year. That is roughly equivalent to the sizeRead MoreThe Severity and Extent of Environmental Scarcity in Pakistan3240 Words   |  13 Pagesconsolidate territory and defend the nation prompted a rapid expansion of administrative machinery and wholesale adoption of the colonial British vice regal system of administration and resource management. This system had been long geared to maintaining law, order, and the collection of revenues on behalf of the British Empire. It included a professional civil service with a deep knowledge of local cond itions as well as great access to and influence over provincial populations. It was an effective toolRead MoreLiving in the Environment 16th Edition Chapter Review and Vocabulary6220 Words   |  25 Pagesreasoning. Give an example of each. Explain why scientific theories and laws are the most important results of science. What is energy? W hat is energy quality? Distinguish between high quality energy and low quality energy. Give an example of each. What is the 2nd Law of Conservation of Energy (1st Law) and why is it important in relation to environmental science? What is the Law of Thermodynamics? Explain why this law means that we can never reduce or recycle high quality energy. What isRead MoreEnvironmental Control and Pollution in Nigeria6978 Words   |  28 Pagesvarious environmental problems. Some of the environmental problems are pollution, soil erosion leading to floods, salt deserts and sea recedes, desertification, landslides, change of river directions, extinction of species, and vulnerable ecosystem in place of more complex and stable ecosystems, depletion of natural resources, waste accumulation, deforestation, thinning of ozone layer and global warming. Environmental Pollution Environmental pollution is defined as the undesirable change in physicalRead MorePestal Analysis of Safaricom Ltd7289 Words   |  30 PagesKenya and has the ambition to become the best company in Africa. In order to achieve this, a strong focus has been placed on quality of service to its customers. Safaricom is and will continue implementing best practices based on Vodafones vast international experience and Telkom Kenyas unique knowledge of the Kenyan market conditions. In the modern world of globalization, Safaricom has been able to keep pace with the global mobile telecommunication scenario by having strategic business associations;Read MoreThe Impact of Agricultural Sector on Economic Growth in Nigeria18675 Words   |  75 PagesParadoxes and Crossroads of Multimodal Nature Professor Eric C. Eboh Professor of Agricultural Economics University of Nigeria CONTENTS 1.0 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 2 2.0 CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF THIS INAUGURAL LECTURE 6 REFLECTIONS ON THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY 8 3.0 4.0 5.0 AGRICULTURE FROM THE LOOKING GLASS OF MAN’S ECONOMIC HISTORY 16 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY FROM PARADIGMATIC VIEWPOINTS ABOUT THE STATE VIS-A-VIS MARKET 21 6.0 NIGERIAN AGRICULTURE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF MODELSRead MoreOne Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. 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